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Treatment of Overactive Bladder in Women

December 20, 2016

Structured AbstractObjectives:The Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center systematically reviewed evidence on treatment of overactive bladder (OAB), urge urinary incontinence, and related symptoms. We focused on prevalence and incidence, treatment outcomes, comparisons of treatments, modifiers of outcomes, and costs.Data:We searched PubMed, MEDLINE┬«, EMBASE, and CINAHL.Review Methods:We included studies published in English from January 1966 to October 2008. … Read more

Institutional Mistrust in the Organization of Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials

December 20, 2016

In this paper I explore the politics of trust in the clinical testing of pharmaceuticals in the US. Specifically, I analyze trust in terms of its institutional manifestations in the pharmaceutical clinical trials industry. In the process of testing new drugs, pharmaceutical companies must (1) protect their proprietary information from the clinicians who conduct their … Read more

“Ready-To-Recruit” or “Ready-To-Consent” Populations?

December 20, 2016

This paper queries the pharmaceutical industry’s concept of “ready-to-recruit” populations by examining its recruitment strategies for clinical trials and the types of human subjects who participate in these drug studies. The argument is that the pharmaceutical industry has profited from a system comprised of what can more aptly be characterized as ready-to-consent populations, meaning populations … Read more

Medical Research for Hire

December 20, 2016

Today, more than 75 percent of pharmaceutical drug trials in the United States are being conducted in the private sector. Once the sole province of academic researchers, these important studies are now being outsourced to non-academic physicians.According to Jill A. Fisher, this major change in the way medical research is performed is the outcome of … Read more

Tracking the Social Dimensions of RFID Systems in Hospitals

December 20, 2016

BACKGROUND: Radio frequency identification (RFID) is an emerging technology that is rapidly becoming the standard for hospitals to track inventory, identify patients, and manage personnel. METHODS: Research involved qualitative methods including participant observation and interviews with hospital staff members and industry consultants in the United States. RESULTS: Hospital staff, especially nurses, expressed concern about the … Read more

Governing Human Subjects Research in the USA

December 20, 2016

The abuse of human subjects has always been, and continues to be, a problem in the United States. In spite of regulation to protect subjects, the exploitation of disenfranchised groups and the reproduction of social inequalities are entrenched in the American research enterprise. This paper argues that current approaches to protecting subjects are insufficient because … Read more

Coming Soon to a Physician Near You

December 20, 2016

This paper aims to expand standard conceptions of current ethical issues by discussing pharmaceutical clinical trials in terms of the broader political economy. Specifically, it explores one important characteristic of the political economy in the United States: the trend towards the neoliberalization of health care. First, it provides an overview of neoliberalism and its manifestations … Read more

Procedural Misconceptions and Informed Consent

December 20, 2016

This paper provides a simultaneously reflexive and analytical framework to think about obstacles to truly informed consent in social science and biomedical research. To do so, it argues that informed consent often goes awry due to procedural misconceptions built into the research context. The concept of procedural misconception is introduced to describe how individuals respond … Read more