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Access to HIV Care in Jails: Perspectives from People Living with HIV in North Carolina

January 24, 2022

Most incarcerations for people living with HIV (PLWH) occur in jails, yet studies of HIV care during jail incarceration are limited. As part of a larger study to explore the ethical considerations in extending public health HIV surveillance to jail settings, we conducted semi-structured interviews with twenty-three PLWH with more than 300 distinct jail incarcerations … Continued

Study to Examine Physicians’ Pandemic Stress (STEPPS)

October 14, 2021

Mara Buchbinder has launched the Study to Examine Physicians’ Pandemic Stress (STEPPS) with funding from the Greenwall Foundation and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The COVID-19 pandemic has intensified ongoing stress, overwork, and disillusionment among the healthcare workforce. Healthcare professionals responding to the pandemic are experiencing crises of moral integrity and personal … Continued

“I still feel so lost”: Experiences of Women Receiving SANE Care During the Year after Sexual Assault

August 30, 2021

Objective Emergency caregivers provide initial care to women sexual assault (SA) survivors. An improved understanding of the issues facing this population can aide emergency care practitioners in providing high quality care. The goal of this study was to share the experiences of women SA survivors with the emergency care practitioners that care for them. Methods … Continued

Scripting Death Stories of Assisted Dying in America

May 1, 2021

Buy Book How the legalization of assisted dying is changing our lives. Over the past five years, medical aid-in-dying (also known as assisted suicide) has expanded rapidly in the United States and is now legally available to one in five Americans. This growing social and political movement heralds the possibility of a new era of … Continued

Clinical Discussion of Medical Aid-in-Dying: Minimizing Harms and Ensuring Informed Choice

March 23, 2021

Objective The implementation of medical aid-in-dying (MAID) poses new challenges for clinical communication and counseling. Among these, health care providers must consider whether to initiate a discussion of MAID with eligible patients who do not directly ask about it. Norms and policies concerning this issue vary tremendously across jurisdictions where MAID is legally authorized, reflecting … Continued

Practical and Ethical Concerns in Implementing Enhanced Surveillance Methods to Improve Continuity of HIV Care: Qualitative Expert Stakeholder Study

September 16, 2020

Background: Retention in HIV care is critical to maintaining viral suppression and preventing further transmission, yet less than 50% of people living with HIV in the United States are engaged in care. All US states have a funding mandate to implement Data-to-Care (D2C) programs, which use surveillance data (eg, laboratory, Medicaid billing) to identify out-of-care … Continued

Clinical discussion of Medical Aid-in-Dying: minimizing harms and ensuring informed choice

September 1, 2020

Abstract Objective The implementation of medical aid-in-dying (MAID) poses new challenges for clinical communication and counseling. Among these, health care providers must consider whether to initiate a discussion of MAID with eligible patients who do not directly ask about it. Norms and policies concerning this issue vary tremendously across jurisdictions where MAID is legally authorized, … Continued